Why Are Sippy Cups Not Recommended?

How do you introduce a sippy cup?

A baby who’s ready to sit up in a high chair (usually at about 6 months) is ready to drink from her first sippy cup — or at least, ready to learn how to drink from a sippy cup….Introducing a Sippy CupChoose the right cup.

Fill it with the familiar.

Go slow.

Invite participation.

Vary the cup.

Take no for an answer..

What’s wrong with sippy cups?

Tooth Decay Nimali Fernando, co-author of Raising a Healthy Happy Eater, says: “Sippy cups encourage babies to do just that, to sip. But constant sipping on anything but water isn’t good for the health of a baby’s new teeth. Acid from the drink may wear down the enamel and demineralize teeth, leading to tooth decay.

At what age should you stop using a sippy cup?

2In actuality, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children be weaned from the sippy cup by age 2 (1). But in the real world, we know that can get a bit hairy. Though 2-year-olds may be able to drink effectively from a regular cup, they are likely to still spill regularly.

Why are sippy cups better than bottles?

Good transition: Sippy cups provide a good transition from a bottle to a regular cup, giving your child more control over when and how she drinks. Versatile: Sippy cups come in an almost endless array of colors, sizes, and designs, so you are sure to find one that your baby will be happy to use.

When should babies start drinking water?

From 6 months of age, you can give your baby small amounts of water, if needed, in addition to their breastmilk or formula feeds. From around 6 months old, you can offer small amounts of cooled boiled tap water but not replace their breastmilk or formula feeds.

Do sippy cups cause crooked teeth?

The use of sippy cups with a spout contributes to the malformation of the hard palate, leading to malocclusions and crooked teeth. This means that your child’s ability to develop proper drinking, swallowing, and articulation skills can be delayed.

When should I give my baby a cup?

Once your baby is 6 months and learning to eat solid foods, it’s fine to practice drinking from a cup. Teaching your baby to take sips from a cup now makes it easier to transition from breast or bottle down the road, plus it helps them develop important fine motor skills and coordination.

When should I introduce a straw cup?

The best age to transition to a straw cup is between 9 and 15 months of age though it may vary depending on the baby. Just like introducing a sippy cup, there should be no major changes taking place in baby’s life while introducing a straw cup. Straw cups normally come with flexible and hard straws.

Do sippy cups affect speech?

While occasional use of a sippy cup might not have any lasting effects, when one is in use all the time, it could impair speech and language development because the tongue is unable to elevate for long periods. Thus, it rests forward in the mouth (sometimes called “paci-mouth”).

Are sippy cups necessary?

Sippy cups can keep children hydrated in a spill-proof fashion, without requiring an enormous amount of clean-up and can help kids understand their own thirst. They can also be part of a variety of different cups parents use to help children understand different situations or simply develop drinking skills.

Is sippy cup or straw better?

For this reason, some pediatricians and speech and language pathologists recommend straw cups over sippy cups. With straw cups, your baby is more likely to learn the new skill of pulling her tongue to the back of her mouth when she drinks.

Is a straw cup better than a sippy cup?

A straw cup will help to build lip, cheek, and tongue strength and will promote an appropriate resting position of the tongue for future speech development and a proper swallow pattern. A sippy cup on the other hand will encourage a forward tongue resting position, which often results in a frontal lingual lisp.

Can a 6 month old drink from a straw?

Similar to the options in 6-12 months, the type of cup you choose comes down to the child. Toddlers may prefer to move on from a spouted cup to a spoutless or straw because it’s easy for them to master at this age but all are still an option. Cup sizes are also larger, offering more capacity for milk and water.